Apple AR: Tim Cook on Improving Conversations with Augmented Reality "Charts & Other Things"

In a recent interview with Kara Swisher on the New York Times Sway podcast, Tim Cook discusses the pursuit of ever-greater user privacy and future AR plans.

Apple AR: Tim Cook on Improving Conversations with Augmented Reality "Charts & Other Things"

In an interview with The New York Times, Tim Cook talks Privacy, Augmented Reality, his tenure as Apple CEO, among other things.

"When I think about that in different fields, whether it’s health, whether it’s education, whether it’s gaming, whether it’s retail, I’m already seeing AR take off in some of these areas with use of the phone. And I think the promise is even greater in the future," he said.

In an interview with The New York Times, Tim Cook talks Privacy, Augmented Reality, his tenure as Apple CEO, among other things.

In a recent interview with Kara Swisher on The New York Times Sway podcast, Apple CEO Tim Cook, discussed the pursuit of ever-greater user privacy and Apple's future plans for Augmented Reality technology. He also opened up about his own future as Apple CEO and potential products we could see pretty soon.

Swisher opened the interview by discussing Apple's decision to knock Parler off the App Store. Parler is a Facebook/Twitter-alternative Social Media platform with a following among right-wing commentators and their supporters. The platform courted headlines in the days following the January 6th failed Capitol Insurrection, when it was reported that the Capitol Riot had been organised on the platform. However, similar reports implicated Facebook and Twitter as well.

When asked if tech companies bear responsibility for the spread of misinformation on their platforms, Tim Cook explained that Apple had "always believed in curation":

And so we review every app that goes on the store. That doesn’t mean that we’re perfect at doing it. We’re not. But we care deeply about what we’re offering our users. And when we have a news product like Apple News, we have human editors that are selecting the key stories. And so, they’re avoiding all of the misinformation that is out there. The reality is that the web in some areas has become a dark place. And without curation, you wind up with this firehose of things that I would not want to put into an amplifier.

Later in the interview, Cook described his excitement about the two Big-As: AR (Augmented Reality) and AI (Artificial Intelligence). Cook then described what Apple "may or may not" have in the pipeline, hinting at some sort of headset that "improves" conversations with "charts or other things":

...in terms of AR, the promise of AR is that you and I are having a great conversation right now. Arguably, it could even be better if we were able to augment our discussion with charts or other things to appear. And your audience would also benefit from this, too, I think. And so when I think about that in different fields, whether it’s health, whether it’s education, whether it’s gaming, whether it’s retail, I’m already seeing AR take off in some of these areas with use of the phone. And I think the promise is even greater in the future.

That doesn't give us a whole lot to work with but it's awesome to know that Tim Cook, perhaps the most influential figure in the tech industry today, is so excited about Augmented Reality. Cook also discussed AI, his work with Elon Musk and Tesla (even though he claims he's never spoken to Elon), claims he may not be Apple CEO in ten years, and appraises Hollywood:

I'm not a Hollywood guy. But Kara, I love great content.

High-profile Apple figures are often coy about their AR plans, but if leaks and headlines are to be believed, they are already hard at work at something really cool. Recently, for instance, Apple's iPhone 12 Pro released with a LiDAR Scanner for "Instant AR capabilities". That's not even to mention the flood of patents, reports and leaks which have trickled out over the past few months. If you're interested in checking out the full interview, you can access it free of charge now at The New York Times.