Facebook launch 'Conduct in VR Policy' to protect users from abuse

Facebook launch 'Conduct in VR Policy' to protect users from abuse

Just in time for the Oculus Quest 2's shipping date, Facebook made headlines again this week as their requirement to log-in with a FB account to new Oculus headsets came into effect.

As we see users get their hands on the Quest 2 for the first time, Facebook have made changes to their Community Standards outline in order to foster a safer environment for users in VR.

In a statement by the company, Facebook-Oculus said:

With Oculus, we're creating new ways for people to defy distance and connect with each other and the world around them. Through virtual reality, we can radically redefine the way in which people work, play and connect. This is a new environment for many people, and it's important to have clear guidelines for respectful behaviour. We want everyone to feel safe while they enjoy an immersive virtual experience.

Facebook-Oculus have identified specifically that "Oculus users come from many different backgrounds," so these new changes are intended to ensure "conduct (as well as any content created or shared) is appropriate for a diverse audience and does not violate the Community Standards."

Facebook-Oculus have also stated that any violation of the Facebook Community Standards or the new Conduct in VR Policy may result in account restriction, suspension or deletion. (Credit: Facebook-Oculus)

The company has tightened regulations relating to harassment and bullying, including:

Stalking or repeatedly following others against their wishes.
Cornering, blocking normal movement, physically intimidating or invading personal space without consent.
Encouraging the intimidation or bullying of others, including threats to SWAT, hack, dox or DDOS.
Supporting or representing hateful ideologies or groups by using symbols or attacking people on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, caste, sex, gender, gender identity and serious disease or disability.
Impersonate a Facebook employee, partner, representative or other real person or encourage other users to do so.

Furthermore, changes to the Community Standards also focus on sexual conduct in VR, including:

Touching someone in a sexual way or making sexual gestures.
Sexualising minors in any way. In cases of sexual exploitation of children, we report content to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.

Facebook-Oculus have also stated that any violation of the Facebook Community Standards or the new Conduct in VR Policy may result in account restriction, suspension or deletion.

Now you're up to date with the new policy updates, you can get on with using the brand new Oculus Quest 2. That is, if you've gotten it yet. If you're not sure how delayed your unit will be, you can find out here.

Author

Liam Noble Shearer

I'm a writer and journalised based in the far North of Scotland with an interest in VR tech, games and industry news.

Scotland http://www.liamnshearer.com Liam Noble Shearer

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